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Beginning Android Application development – Getting Started with Android Programming

What this Book [Beginning Android Application development] covers

Beginning Android Application development covers the fundamentals of Android programming using the Android SDK. It is divided into 11 chapters and three appendices.
Chapter 1: Getting Started with Android Programming covers the basics of the Android OS and its current state. You will learn about the features of Android devices, as well as some of the popular devices in the market. You will then learn how to download and install all the required tools to develop Android applications and then test them on the Android Emulator.
Chapter 2: Activities and Intents gets you acquainted with the two fundamental concepts in Android programming: activities and intents. Activities are the building blocks of an Android application. You will  learn how to link activities together to form a complete Android application using intents, the glue to links  activities and one of the unique characteristics of the Android OS.
Chapter 3: Getting to Know the Android User Interface covers the various components that make up the UI of an Android application. You will learn about the various layouts you can use to build the UI of your application, and the numerous events that are associated with the UI when users interact with the application.
Chapter 4: Designing Your User Interface Using Views walks you through the various basic views you can use to build your Android UI. You will learn three main groups of views: basic views, picker views, and list views.
Chapter 5: Displaying Pictures and Menus with Views continues the exploration of views. Here, you will learn how to display images using the various image views, as well as display options and context menus in your application. This chapter ends with some additional cool views that you can use to spice up your application.
Chapter 6: Data Persistence shows you how to save, or store, data in your Android application. In addition to learning the various techniques to store user data, you will also learn file manipulation and how to save files onto internal and external storage (SD card). In addition, you will learn how to create and use a SQLite database in your Android application.
Chapter 7: Content Providers discusses how data can be shared among different applications on an Android device. You will learn how to use a content provider and then build one yourself.
Chapter 8: Messaging and Networking explores two of the most interesting topics in mobile programming — sending SMS messages and network programming.
You will learn how to programmatically send and receive SMS and e-mail messages; and how to connect to web servers to download data.
Finally, you will see how Web services can be consumed in an Android application.
Chapter 9: Location-Based Services demonstrates how to build a location-based service application using Google Maps. You will also learn how to obtain geographical location data and then display the location on the map.
Chapter 10: Developing Android Services shows you how you can write applications using services. Services are background applications that run without a UI. You will learn how to run your services asynchronously on a separate thread, and how your activities can communicate with them.

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Flash Mobile Developing Andoid and IOS Applications

Setting up Flash CS5 for Android Development …………………………………………. 3
Designing and Developing for Android Hardware ……………………………….. 7
Configuring the Android SDK Publish Setting …………………………………… 12
Setting up Flash CS5 for Android Development ………………………………… 15
Installing Your AIR Application onto an Android OS …………………………… 17
Building Your First Application for Android Using Flash CS5 ……………… 18
Project 1: Creating Your First App Using Flash CS5 ………………………………… 27
Setting up Your Development Environment ………………………………………. 27
Creating the Graphics ………………………………………………………………………. 35
Building an Application ……………………………………………………………………. 37
Running Your App on Your Android Phone ………………………………………… 43
Section 2
Rapid Android Development in Flash CS5 ……………………………………………….. 49
Creating Content for Your Android Phone That Does
Not Require Programming ……………………………………………………………….. 49
Animation Techniques You Should Use on Mobile Devices ………………… 50
Controlling Sound …………………………………………………………………………… 71
Controlling Video …………………………………………………………………………….. 80
Working in the Third Dimension ……………………………………………………….. 83
What You Have Learned …………………………………………………………………… 86

Developing Mobile Apps using ActionScript ………………………………………… 101
Enabling Flash to Execute Solutions Faster with AVM 2.0 ………………… 102
What You Can Expect When You Use AS3 ……………………………………….. 102
Controlling Data ………………………………………………………………………………11 3
Controlling Text ……………………………………………………………………………….11 6
Drawing with the Shape Class ………………………………………………………….11 7
Using ActionScript to Control Animation, Audio, and
Video in Your Android Apps ……………………………………………………………..11 8
Extending Flash with Open Source Libraries …………………………………… 125
Summary ………………………………………………………………………………………. 125
Project 3: Building Sprite’s 123 ……………………………………………………………… 127
Setting Up the Project to Run on an iPhone …………………………………….. 128
Setting Up the Timeline………………………………………………………………….. 131
Adding Interaction to Your Number Screens …………………………………… 134
Completing the Application ……………………………………………………………. 137
Section 4
Leveraging Custom iPhone and Android Interface
Calls with ActionScript ………………………………………………………………………….. 141
Using Gestures in Your Apps ………………………………………………………….. 142
Working with Gestures …………………………………………………………………… 146

Which Way Is Up? Controlling Orientation with
the Android Accelerometer …………………………………………………………….. 150
Knowing Where You Are, Using Geolocation …………………………………… 152
Loading RSS Data into Flash ………………………………………………………….. 153
Adding Permissions to Your Apps …………………………………………………… 156
Loading Web Pages into the StageWebView ……………………………………. 157
Controlling the Use of the Microphone …………………………………………… 159
Controlling the Camera ………………………………………………………………….. 161
Additional Features on AIR 2.5 for Android ……………………………………… 164
Summary ………………………………………………………………………………………. 164
Project 4: Building a Gesture-Driven Application ………………………………… 165
Getting Started ………………………………………………………………………………. 165
Navigating Using the Tap Gesture …………………………………………………… 167
Adding a Swipe Gesture to Move from One Screen to the Next ……….. 172
Adding Drag and Drop Gestures …………………………………………………….. 174
Using Geolocation to Find Where You Are ………………………………………. 176
Summary ………………………………………………………………………………………. 178
Section 5
Building Games with Flash for the Mobile Market ……………………………….. 181
Getting Started with Game Development ……………………………………….. 181
Making It Easier to Write Code with Libraries ………………………………….. 184
Using Game Engines ……………………………………………………………………… 203
Developing Your Game …………………………………………………………………… 240
Project 5: Building a Mobile Game ……………………………………………………….. 241
Playing Space Rocket …………………………………………………………………….. 242
Getting Started ………………………………………………………………………………. 242
Game Assets and Default Layer Structure ……………………………………….. 244
Adding the Code to the Game ………………………………………………………… 245
Controlling the Missiles …………………………………………………………………. 251
Controlling the Falling Rocks ………………………………………………………….. 254

Section 6
Deploying Mobile Apps with Flash CS5 …………………………………………………. 259
Deploying Your Apps to Apple’s iTunes ……………………………………………. 259
Deploying Your Apps to Google’s Android Market ……………………………. 266
Building for iPad Devices ……………………………………………………………….. 268
Building for Tablets and TV …………………………………………………………….. 269
Adding Advertising to Your Apps …………………………………………………….. 270
Tracking Your App’s Success …………………………………………………………… 270
Marketing Your Apps ……………………………………………………………………… 271
Summary ………………………………………………………………………………………. 272
Project 6: Publishing Your Apps into the Many Different App Stores …… 273
Choosing Where to Sell Your Application ………………………………………… 273
Publishing Android Apps in Your Own Store ……………………………………. 274
Deploying to the Android Market ……………………………………………………. 275
Running the Gauntlet That Is Apple’s iTunes
App Store Submission Process ………………………………………………………. 277
Index …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 283

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Pro Android Web Apps Develop for Android Using HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript

What’s a Mobile Web App?

A mobile web app is an application that is built with the core client web technologies of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, and is specifically designed for mobile devices. Helping mobile web apps get a bit of attention are the trends toward HTML5 and CSS3—the latest “versions” of two of the technologies. We explore both HTML5 and CSS3 in detail in the book, along with a lot of  JavaScript.
JavaScript is the language that many developers love to hate. Some don’t even regard it as a programming language at all. However, JavaScript is here for the long haul, and is likely to be one of the most in demand skillsets for the next five years.

Which Technologies Are Used in This Book?

In the book, we work through lots (and lots) of JavaScript code. There’s obviously quite a bit of HTML and CSS there too, but JavaScript really is the language of mobile web app development.
If you haven’t worked with JavaScript in the past, we don’t completely drop you in at the deep end, but we would recommend getting hold of some learning materials, as this isn’t a JavaScript fundamentals book. We also make extensive use of the excellent jQuery JavaScript library to make life generally easier during development. If that is something that is new to you, we recommend having a jQuery tutorial or two handy as well. If you have experience with Prototype, MooTools, or another of jQuery’s “competitors,” then you should be able to adapt the sample code in the book with relative ease.
In terms of mobile web apps (and other JavaScript-rich web apps), learning how to structure your applications for readability and maintainability is important. This is one of the reasons that we have chosen to work through a couple of small application-sized projects in the book rather than small code-snippets showing particular functionality. This will allow you to become familiar with the different technical aspects of mobile web app development, and also gain an understanding of how you might effectively put a real-world mobile web application together.
If you are already familiar with web application development, this book should make the transition to mobile web app development simple. If, however, you are coming from a mobile application development perspective, and are looking to explore the web app approach, having those extra learning materials will make a big difference.

What’s in This Book

This book is structured around two application samples that will teach you the various aspects of mobile web app development. Chapters 2–6 deal with the first mini application of a simple “To Do List”, and Chapters 8–12 guide you through the beginnings of building a simple locationaware game.
In and around these two “main meals” we have three “snack” chapters. Chapter 1 is focused on getting you up and running with the basic concepts for writing Android web apps. Chapter 7 is a short look at working with interactivity and the HTML5 canvas. And finally, Chapter 13 takes a look at some of the things that might be coming our way in the world of mobile apps.
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Android Development with Flash _ Your visual blueprint for developing mobile apps

Who This Book Is For?

This book is for intermediate-to-advanced Flash developers who want to use their knowledge of Flash and ActionScript to develop AIR Android applications.
This book specifically focuses on the Android platform, but many of the topics and examples can be used  to develop for any AIR mobile platform.

Introducing Android Devices

It is an exciting time to be a Flash developer. Adobe has taken big steps in making the Flash platform available on as many devices as possible. The Open Screen Project is an Adobe-led initiative whose goal is to “enable consumers to engage with rich Internet experiences seamlessly across any device, anywhere,”  as it says on its Web site, at www.openscreenproject.org.

Introducing the Available APIs

With the ability to publish Android applications from Flash CS5 comes a set of new APIs that enable you  to take advantage of some of the features the Android platform has to offer. However, Adobe’s strategy is not to support only the Android platform but as many platforms as possible. This is the reason you  may not see as many Android-specific features as you may like or think. Adobe is being very pragmatic about what new features it introduces and how its APIs will look on future platforms, mobile or otherwise. Adobe’s goal is to provide one consistent API for all platforms. For example, the ActionScript code should be the same for accessing a camera whether you are developing applications for the Web,  desktop, Android, iPhone, or any other future supported platform.

Become an Android Developer

In order to install applications on your device, you must first have it set up to enable debugging. Depending on which operating system you are  currently developing on, the number of steps may vary. If you are developing on a Windows computer, you will  need to download and install the USB driver package using the Android SDK and AVD Manager. This process is the same as installing the additional  Android SDK components. For more details, see the section “Get the Android SDK” earlier in this chapter. If you already completed the steps in that section and selected all the available packages, there is a good chance that you have already installed this. You can check to see if it has been downloaded by looking for the usb_driver directory in the root of your SDK. The process for installing the drivers is different for each version of Windows, and I suggest that you follow the instructions on the Android Developers site, http://developer.android.com/sdk/win-usb.html, in order to install them correctly.
If you are using a Mac OS X computer for development, you can skip having to install the USB drivers. The steps below should just work.
You can now connect your device to your computer with the USB cable included with your device. If it has connected correctly, you should see the USB symbol in the notifications area of the status bar. The next step is to turn on USB debugging when the device is connected. To do so, on your device, you go to the list of options that can be used during development and choose to debug applications on the device.

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Professional Android Application Development

Whom Professional Android Application Development Is For?

This book is for anyone interested in creating applications for the Android mobile phone platform. It includes information that will be valuable, whether you’re an experienced mobile developer or making your fi rst foray, via Android, into writing mobile applications.
It will help if readers have used mobile phones (particularly phones running Android), but it’s not necessary, nor is prior experience in mobile phone development. It’s expected that you’ll have some experience in software development and be familiar with basic development practices.
While knowledge of  Java is helpful, it’s not a necessity.
Chapters 1 and 2 introduce mobile development and contain instructions to get you started in Android.
Beyond that, there’s no requirement to read the chapters in order, although a good understanding of the core components described in Chapters 3 through 6 is important before you venture into the remaining chapters. Chapters 7 through 11 cover a variety of optional and advanced functionality and can be read in  whatever order interest or need dictates.

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Programming Android Java Programming for the New Generation of Mobile Devices

Programming Android

Java Programming for the New Generation of Mobile Devices

The purpose of this book is to enable you to create well-engineered Android applications that go beyond the scope of small example applications.
This book is for people coming to Android programming from a variety of backgrounds.
If you have been programming iPhone or Mac OS applications in Objective-C, you will find coverage of Android tools and Java language features relevant to Android programming that will help you bring your knowledge of mobile application development to Android.
If you are an experienced Java coder, you will find coverage of Android application architecture that will enable you to use your Java expertise in this newly vibrant world of client Java application development.
In short, this is a book for people with some relevant experience in object-oriented languages, mobile applications, REST applications, and similar disciplines who want to go further than an introductory book or online tutorials will take them.

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Google on the Go Using an Android-Powered Mobile Phone

Who Is This Book For?

I’d love to say that this book [Google on the Go Using an Android-Powered Mobile Phone] is for you, no matter who you are. But no one book could cover the wide range of cell phone users when it comes to discussing a new system.
So, how do you know if this book is for you?
Maybe all you’ve ever used a standard mobile phone for is making phone calls.
Maybe you occasionally send a text message or use your cell phone camera to share pictures with friends. Maybe you’d like to jump ahead to the latest phone software, but you feel a little nervous about that.
If that sounds like you, I’m writing for you.
However, if you’re constantly buying new technologies and skipping the user’s manual, preferring to play with what you’ve purchased and figure it out for yourself, you can still use this book as a handy quick  reference to a feature that you forgot how to configure.
If you’re already planning what software you can write for Android, this probably isn’t the right book.
We give you pointers to some resources to help you write software, but this topic is not discussed in depth.

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Beginning Mobile Web Development Building Applications iPhone & Android

Getting Started with Mobile Web Development

Part 1 introduces the mobile industry, mobile users, and the Mobile Web. You’ll meet web policymakers, authors of mobile best practices, and drafters of Mobile Web standards. You’ll learn to evaluate a standard or best practice and judge its appropriateness for your mobile web project.
With this knowledge of the ecosystem, you’ll prepare for a mobile web development project by setting up a development environment, selecting an IDE, and configuring a web server with common mobile MIME types. Then you’ll extend Firefox with add-ons for viewing mobile web pages on the desktop, using mobile emulators and actual mobile devices for more accurate views of the Mobile Web.
Once the development environment is ready, you’ll examine the markup and scripting languages that drive rich, lightweight web experiences on all kinds of mobile devices, especially smartphones. You’ll study HTML, XHTML-MP, and WML, then style mobile markup using CSS. Finally, you’ll review best practices for coding web pages for mobile devices.

The Syntax of the Mobile Web

Part 2 explores the markup, scripting languages, and device databases that enable device-aware mobile web development. You’ll learn about the markup languages that drive rich, lightweight web experiences on all kinds of mobile devices, especially smartphones. You’ll study HTML, XHTML-MP, and WML, style mobile markup using CSS, and get to know the best practices for coding web pages for mobile devices.
You’ll learn to use databases of mobile device characteristics to identify web traffic from mobile phones, and adapt markup to target mobile devices and mobile browser versions.
For capable mobile devices, you’ll iteratively enrich a mobile web site with client-side interactivity powered by ECMAScript-MP, JavaScript, and AJAX. You’ll also examine the differences in DOM structure between mobile browsers, and delve into strategies for cross-platform scripting in a mobile environment.

Advanced Mobile Web Development Techniques

Part 3 introduces advanced development techniques that improve Mobile Web usability and enhance the user experience on smartphone browsers.
Here you’ll see how to make the design and usability of your Mobile Web pages even better to help the mobile user easily and rapidly achieve goals. You’ll compare smartphone screen dimensions, examine sample page layouts, and learn about design and usability best practices.
Then you’ll investigate the advanced features of smartphone browsers. You’ll learn how to take advantage of these features by exploring XHTML and JavaScript techniques for enhancing the user experience of Mobile Web applications on a number of smartphone browsers, including the iPhone, Android, Palm webOS, BlackBerry, Nokia Series 60, Opera, and Windows Mobile.

Deploying into the Mobile Ecosystem

By now, your adaptive and standards-compliant Mobile Web site is running, but it may need tuning to ensure the best possible performance on the Mobile Web.

Part 4 provides real-world strategies to ensure the survival and adoption of your Mobile Web content.
You’ll learn to compress document size, reduce web server transactions, and coerce mobile browsers into caching your Mobile Web content.
You’ll validate mobile markup syntax, styles, and overall site readiness using three validation services from W3C and dotMobi.
You’ll test your Mobile Web site using mobile browser emulators as well as browsers on actual mobile devices.
You’ll deploy your Mobile Web content into the ecosystem and learn how to use a simple script to distinguish between desktop and mobile browser traffic, routing mobile browsers to your optimized Mobile Web site. You’ll acquire Mobile Web traffic through search engine submission, advertising, promotions, whitelisting, and mobile SEO.
You’ll defensively fortify your Mobile Web site to discourage transcoders from machineadapting markup that is already optimized for mobile devices. You’ll learn to identify when your Mobile Web site encounters traffic from transcoders, and adapt your pages for the device originating the request rather than the transcoder.
Finally, you’ll share your Mobile Web and phone expertise by contributing device capabilities, browser test results, and mobile development tips and tricks with the mobile development community.

Appendixes

Part 5 contains a range of reference material to give you a leg up on learning Mobile Web development.  You’ll find user-agents, browser information, and HTTP request headers supplied for many types of mobile devices, especially smartphones. There’s a glossary to help you decipher mobile industry acronyms, technical terms, and jargon. And a case study takes you under the hood as it describes an experiment that uncovers the actual caching and concurrency behavior of mobile browsers.
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Android Application Testing Guide- Build Android applications

Android Application Testing Guide Build intensively tested and bug free Android applications

What this book covers
Chapter 1, Getting Started with Testing introduces the different types of testing and their applicability to software development projects in general and to Android in particular.

Chapter 2, Testing on Android covers testing on the Android platform, Unit testing and JUnit, creating an Android Test project, and running tests.
Chapter 3, Building Blocks on the Android SDK starts digging a bit deeper to recognize the building blocks available to create the tests. It covers Assertions, TouchUtils, intended to test User Interfaces, Mock objects, Instrumentation, and TestCase class hierarchies featuring UML diagrams.
Chapter 4, Test Driven Development introduces the Test Driven Development discipline. It starts with a general revision and later on moves to the concepts and techniques closely related to the Android platform. This is a code intensive chapter.
Chapter 5, Android Testing Environment provides different conditions to run the tests.
It starts with the creation of the Android Virtual Devices (AVD) to provide different conditions and configurations for the application under test and runs the tests using the available options. Finally, it introduces monkey as a way to generate simulated events used for testing.
Chapter 6, Behavior Driven Development introduces Behavior Driven Development and some concepts such as like the use of a common vocabulary to express the tests and the inclusion of business participants in the software development project.
Chapter 7, Testing Recipes provides practical examples of different common situations you will encounter applying the disciplines and techniques described before. The examples are presented in a Cookbook style so you can adapt and use them for your projects. The recipes cover Android Unit tests, Activities, Applications, Databases and ContentProviders, Local and Remote Services, UIs, Exceptions, Parsers, and Memory leaks.
Chapter 8, Continuous Integration introduces this agile technique for software engineering that aims to improve the software quality and to reduce the time taken to integrate changes by continuously applying integration and testing frequently.
Chapter 9, Performance Testing introduces a series of concepts related to benchmarking and profiles from traditional logging statement methods to Creating Android performance tests and using profiling tools. This chapter also presents Caliper to create microbenchmarks.
Chapter 10, Alternative Testing Tactics covers building Android from source, code coverage using EMMA, Robotium, testing on hosts, and Robolectric.

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The Droid Pocket Guide PDF EBook

The Droid Pocket Guide covers the Droid brand of mobile phones made by Motorola and HTC Corp., sold in the United States by Verizon Wireless.
If you’re using a Droid in another country or on another carrier, some screens and icons may look slightly different, but you should still be able to find your way around pretty easily with this Pocket Guide.

The book covers two Droid handsets on the market as of February 2010: the Droid (Motorola) and the Droid Eris (HTC). I will refer to both handsets as Droid unless I specifically want to differentiate something that’s specific to the Droid Eris.

The Droid runs Android version 2.0, and the Droid Eris runs Android version 1.5. Because all Droids should be able to run Android 2.x by the time you read this book, I focus on Android 2.0 herein.
Another cosmetic difference is that the Droid runs the stock version of Android, whereas the Droid Eris runs a customized Android user interface that HTC calls the Sense user interface, or Sense UI.
This means  that some icons and screens on the Droid Eris will be slightly different from those featured in this book, but don’t panic; most of the functionality is the same on both Droid phones.
If you’re running a version of Android earlier than 2.0.1, some features covered in this book may not be available. I recommend that you upgrade your Droid’s software to the latest version to take advantage of the newest features and bug fixes. You can upgrade by visiting the appropriate Web page:

http://support.vzw.com/information/droid_upgrade.html
http://support.vzw.com/information/droid_eris_upgrade.html
Finally, it’s important to note that because of Android’s open-source foundation, any wireless carrier can modify the look and feel of Android to suit its needs. For this reason, some screens, icons, and behaviors may be slightly different from what you find in this book.

As you start down the path to mastering the Droid, having some background information will help you form a good foundation of knowledge to build on.
In this chapter, I review some background on Google and Android, and discuss how the Droid came to be.
Then I dive right into the  phone itself, its features, what comes in the box, and some user-interface tips and tricks.

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